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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)
really does have an independent streak. >> rose: we continue with a look at the future of latin america with john coatsworth dean of columbia university international and public affair, kevin cassas zamora of the brookings institution and former vice president of costa rica, greg grandin at new york university and michael shifter, incoming president of the interamerican dialogue. justice stevens and latin america, coming up. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the coca-cola company. supporting this program since 2002. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is chaálie rose. >> justice john paul stevens today announced his retirement from the supreme court. he had been on the court 34 years. he was known as the leader of the liberal wing. he is the fourth longest serving justice in u.s. history. he was appointed by republican president gerald ford but he was hardly beholden to conservatives. "the new york times" wrote that he may be the last justice from a time when the independence rather than perceived ideology were perceived a
and doing well at this. but at the same time all the countries in the me john know america plays an indispensable role and we'd like america to continue to do that. >> rose: a conversation about china, the united states, asia, and the world with the prime minister of singapore when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: singapore's prime minister lee hsein loong is here. he is in the united states this week for the nuclear security summit and for meetings with american officials, including the secretary of state. he's been prime minister since 2004, he's only the city state's third prime minister. he is the son of lee kwan yue, singapore's founding father. i am pleased to have him back on this broadcast with me while he's making this visit to washington. welcome. >> hello. >> rose: tell me what you think was accomplished at this summit of 46 nations. >> i think president obama did the world a service. this is an issue, nuclear security and nuclear terrorism which is important but not urgent. it's
for america's leadership in the world. we lead in the financial sector. it's one of these parts in the economy we lead. but if people don't trust our market, we can't maintain that leadership. that's why this regulatory reform is not against wall street, it's fundamentally in the interest of the economy. wall street, though, has advanced beyond regulatory supervision and we need to catch up in a way that ensures we don't have the crisis we had in the past and we're prepared for fure ones. >> rose: banks have been lobbying hard against derivatives. >> yes, they have. >> rose: republicans have been up here raising money and talking about it. accusing the president of playing politics. conventional wisdom says the tough herself things are derivatives and consumer agency inside the federal reserve. >> that's two of them. but without a doubt those are in the top three or four issues. but here's... i don't want to have to just repeat what i said about the derivatives, but i take fit you look at this, this is an area that just a few years ago was a minor part of the market and when i say a few, the l
unique because if you look to america the biggest newspaper, "u.s.a. today" and "wall street journal" reach about approximately 3.5 million readers per day. the biggest t.v. show "america's got talent" i think is reaching 11.7, something like that. in germany, there's no t.v. that reaches everyday as much readers as "bild." it's a unique brand, a very strong marketplace. so we said let's use this figure in order to make our 12 million readers potential reporters. so we asked them to send us stories, particularly to send us video content, to send us photos. until today, more than 600,000 photos have been sent. we have printed 18,000. >> rose: am i going to want to read your publications here? or am i going to read in the print? >> you know what? i don't mind. i see ourselves as content producers, branded content producers, marketeers of branded content and if more and more readers will prefer to read it on tablet devices, i like it. because we save printing costs. we save distribution costs, we save paper costs. so in a way it is boosting our business. >> rose: but isn't it inevitable
and america, and president obama from a historical perspective next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the coming. if you've had a coke in the last 20 years, ( screams ) you've had a hand in giving college scholarships... and support to thousands of our nation's... most promising students. ♪ ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama and his russian counterpart president medvedev signed an arms reduction treaty in prague practicaling for nations to trim their stockpiles. about 30% less than currently allowed. this would bring the two countries arsenals to their lowest levels since the end of the cold war. the treaty still has to be ratified by lawmakers in both countries, though the two sides disagree over the future of u.s. missile defense plan, obama medvedev said the fact was a sign of improving relations. >> our relationship had started to drift making it difficult to cooperate on issues of common interest to our people. and when the united states and russi
fault, really." they came out of their bunker to swear they didn't sell america short so what do you make of this? >> i didn't expect the s.e.c. to come out with the big howitzer today the way it did. goldman, i thought, at least could take comfort or defense in the esoteric of this, how hard it is to go home and explain to your mother, i have to use metaphors like wall street turning out tainted hamburger meat and by the end of the conversation the per is more confused than the beginning of the conversation. goldman is relying on a defense of diffusion of responsibility-- "how were we to know it was it was going to fall apart." the ratings agencies were supposed to tell us these were not as robust as they were. if you peel down the layers of the deal, you realize there was another mechanism that goldman and paulson cold. you have a patsy in that trade in effect, and i'm pretty struck that the s.e.c. was aggressive as it was getting to the heart of the trade. >> rose: the s.e.c.. does this represent because they've been under such attack over the last several years, a new aggressive
, new business creates jobs. as it happens here, all the new jobs in america are really created by the small business. and how we encourage that, how... what the governments in our part of the world need to do to really help the culture of entrepreneurship to move forward we have a lot of things to learn from the united states, actually. >> rose: you were born in sudan. >> yes. >> rose: you were an engineer. >> yes, and i did work a little bit in sudan in the postal service, as you call it. then i went to u.k. to do my masters in ph.d. and i ended up as an academic. my specialty was in mobile communications. >> rose: what can be said about your timing is amazing. >> it was wonderful. this was long before cellular came. so that was a subject of my research. when british telecom was about to launch the first mobile service in the u.k., they invited me to go on as technical director. so i was an engineer. it was an accident after that, charlie. i never dreamed to be a businessman. i never planned to be a businessman. i got fed up with the way things happen where half of the company
and equality in america. and i think the country we live in today as arthur less jer used to say, this is the structure of roosevelt. modern america. and who loved roosevelt more than ronald reagan? >> rose: indeed. >> i remember seeing ronald reagan at the white house with congressman pepper once. >> rose: claude pepper from florida. >> claude peper from florida. president reagan said "franklin roosevelt, i voted for him four times. he was certainly greatest president of this century." >> rose: you were investment banker who was once involved in politics and had a lot of public service. a lawyer then investment banker and you spent a lot of time in a commitment to franklin roosevelt in terms... not just this. >> i've had the great opportunity of my life. i started with wild bill donovan >> rose: he was the head of what became the c.i.a.. >> he was the counter of o.s.s. he was ambassador to southeast asia under eisenhower and i was his executive assistance in those days. then i was associated with robert kennedy having been his assistance when he was attorney general. great frien
's not so much about there was wrongdoing or whether there was illegality but in the sense that america has impression about the way things were done. an impression which leads to whatever consequence? >> i think that's absolutely right. and it's an impression of a sort of ugly series of facts where you had winners and a lot of lot of losers and how that played out and the facts of these cases just doesn't put wall street in the best light. >> rose: because in the end there is this connection which people feel. there are a lot of people in the united states-- because unemployment rates suggest it, a lot of other things suggest in the terms of it may be the recovery is beginning, but a lot of people over the last two years have been hurt. >> you bet. >> rose: and they are now looking around and trying to understand why and how long and they look at this and say "it certainly didn't make life better for me, did it?" you >> you bet. and don't forget people's 401(k)s that were severely damaged. so it's not just the borrowers who took on too much home or the people who bought the mortgage securi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)